Join Us Online

This year’s Expanded Animation will be entirely virtual. Participate in the live event on YouTube.

Expanded Animation 2021

The ninth edition of the Expanded Animation Symposium with the topic Tectonic Shift, organized by the Hagenberg Campus of the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria and Ars Electronica, will take place September 10th to 12th as part of the Ars Electronica Festival 2021.

Since 2013, the symposium has explored the collapsing boundaries within Digital Animation and has invited international artists, researchers and developers to present and discuss current positions and future trends.​

SPEAKERS

Expanded Animation features amazing speakers from all around the world. We’re proud to introduce them to you.

Prix Forum

Veneta Androva
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Veneta Androva

venetaandrova.com

Guangli Liu
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Guangli Liu

liuguangli.net

Helen Starr
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Helen Starr

The Mechatronic Library

Erick Oh
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Erick Oh

ErikOh.com

Artist Position

Imge Özbilge & Sine Özbilge
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Imge Özbilge & Sine Özbilge

imge.be & sine.cargo.site

Matthias Winckelmann
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Matthias Winckelmann

mwinckelmann.com

Nonny de la Peña
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Nonny de la Peña

Emblematic Group

Peter Burr
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Peter Burr

PeterBurr.org

Tectonic Shift

Sabine Laimer
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Sabine Laimer

Weta Digital

Annegret Richter
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Annegret Richter

AG Animationsfilm

Tobias Trebeljahr
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Tobias Trebeljahr

Tobias Trebeljahr

Jesper Juul
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Jesper Juul

Royal Danish Academy

Philomena Schwab
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Philomena Schwab

Swiss Game Hub

Art & Industry

Manuel Casasola Merkle & Moritz Schwind
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Manuel Casasola Merkle & Moritz Schwind

Entagma

Christopher Bahry, Ivelle Jargalyn, Mary Anne Ledesma & Alexandre Torres
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Christopher Bahry, Ivelle Jargalyn, Mary Anne Ledesma & Alexandre Torres

Tendril

Synaesthetic Syntax: Sounding Animation / Visualising Audio

Refik Anadol
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Refik Anadol

Refik Anadol Studio

Eleanor Dare & Alexandra Antonopoulou
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Eleanor Dare & Alexandra Antonopoulou

Central Saint Martins / UAL

Eliane Gordeeff
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Eliane Gordeeff

University of Lisbon

Juan Manuel Escalante & Yin Yu
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Juan Manuel Escalante & Yin Yu

California State University

Kate Steenhauer, Andrew Starkey & Jack Caven
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Kate Steenhauer, Andrew Starkey & Jack Caven

katesteenhauer.com

Kate Sicchio, Sarah Groff Hennigh-Palermo & Melody Loveless
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Kate Sicchio, Sarah Groff Hennigh-Palermo & Melody Loveless

Codie

Michael Century & Shawn Lawson
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Michael Century & Shawn Lawson

Rensselaer / Arizona State

Alberto Novello
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Alberto Novello

JesterN

Dirk de Bruyn
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Dirk de Bruyn

Deakin University

Lilly Husbands
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Lilly Husbands

Middlesex University

PROGRAM

This year’s symposium features five distinct tracks: the Prix Forum, the panel Artist Position, Real-Time: Appeal of the Analog, Art & Industry, and the Synaesthetic Syntax conference.

All scheduled times are local Austrian time (Europe/Vienna). Use the dropdown below to switch to a different timezone.

Welcome

The 9th edition of the Expanded Animation symposium series will once again focus on current and future trends at the intersection of animation, art and technology during the Ars Electronica media art festival (September 8-12). On the first two days, international artists, researchers and developers will discuss current processes of change in the expanded field of animation under the motto Tectonic Shift. The central question is: What fundamental changes in conception, production and reception are discernible, and how does the Covid19 pandemic fit into this context? In addition, the winners from the Computer Animation category will give insights into their work in the Prix Forum. On the third day, the Synaesthetic Syntax symposium, launched in 2020, will enter its second round. As in 2020, the Hagenberg cam-pus of the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria will be the hub for the 3-day virtual event.

15 min

https://youtu.be/ddCsJ3VbYKU

Gerfried Stocker

Gerfried Stocker (AT) is a media artist and an engineer for communication technology and has been artistic director and co-CEO of Ars Electronica since 1995. In 1995/96 he developed the groundbreaking exhibition strategies of the Ars Electronica Center with a small team of artists and technicians and was responsible for the setup and establishment of […]

https://ars.electronica.art/
Juergen Hagler

Juergen Hagler (AT) studied art education, experimental visual design, and cultural studies at the University for Art and Design in Linz, Austria. He currently works as a professor of Computer Animation and Animation Studies in the Digital Media department at the Hagenberg Campus of the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria. Since 2014 he a […]

https://research.fh-ooe.at/de/staff/215
Alexander Wilhelm

Alexander Wilhelm (AT) studied Industrial and Interaction Design at the UFG Linz and the ZHDK, Zurich. With his company “The Visioneers,” he worked for clients like Audi and BMW for more than a decade in the field of interaction design and visualisation. 2011 he became a professor for design and animation at the University of […]

https://research.fh-ooe.at/de/staff/21048

Artist Position – Imge Özbilge & Sine Özbilge: Cyber Limbo

Cyber Limbo: Artistic Practice Shifting Between the Physical and the Online Hemisphere
Sine Özbilge and Imge Özbilge are audiovisual directors and visual artists that create both in a duo as well as in separate artistic practices. Sine will give insight into her research-based projects and introduce her current fascinations in this artist talk. She is interested in the impact of new technologies that have altered our perception of the world and ourselves. Human activity in the digital hemisphere ~ in cyberspace, is actually deeply impacting the so called ‘real’ physical world around us. Sine Özbilge’s fascination for this phenomenon has led her to investigate several cases. She researches how this shift in tech and the use of social media is influencing cinematography and narrative structures in visual media and animation whilst altering cognitive behaviours of the human kind. Next to the influence of digital devices on our organic existence, she also looks into the physical manifestations of digital productions through her artistic practice that combines analogue sculpting in VR to 3D printing digital artefacts.

45 min

https://youtu.be/ddCsJ3VbYKU

Imge Özbilge & Sine Özbilge

The sister directors duo Imge Özbilge (TR) and Sine Özbilge (TR) work together as each other’s mirrors. They experiment with the medium of animation, the 16:9 screen, digital installation art and the use of mixed media, exploring new connotations and stylistic forms. When writing concepts, Sine focuses on psychological matters and the subconscious, while Imge […]

https://sine.cargo.site/

Artist Position – Matthias Winckelmann: Rachael Is Not Real: The Automated Digital Designer of the Future

Rachael is Not Real: The Automated Digital Designer of the Future
Digital Artist and Creative Director Matthias Winckelmann talks about the impact of social media on the creative landscape, how we are subconsciously trying to please artificial algorithms and why his creation “Rachael”, the world’s first fully automated 3D design influencer on Instagram, is a first glimpse on how AI will influence the design of the future.

45 min

https://youtu.be/ddCsJ3VbYKU

Matthias Winckelmann

Matthias Winckelmann (DE) is a creative director and digital artist currently based in Berlin, Germany. He is the former creative director and managing partner of the creative ensemble foam Studio Berlin and former head of 3D of the internationally acclaimed design & branding studio ManvsMachine London. Since 2020, he has been working as an independent […]

https://www.mwinckelmann.com/

Break

30 min

Artist Position – Nonny de la Peña

Embodied Narratives: Engaging the Future of Immersive Content
Nonny de la Peña, founder of Emblematic Group — and sometimes called the Godmother of VR — will reflect on her career at the forefront of immersive storytelling. From journalism to filmmaking to virtual reality experiences, Ms. de la Peña has sought to put the audience inside the story. Inspired by the question, “What if you could experience a narrative with your entire body, not just your mind?” Ms. de la Peña combines traditional reporting with emerging virtual reality technology. The result is an evocative experience that gives us stories in a modern way. From experiencing the vanishing glaciers in Greenland from the cockpit of a virtual helicopter, to being hooded and taken into a holding cell in Gitmo, Ms. de la Peña uses the power of embodiment to construct experiences that feel real. Now, Ms. De la Peña wants to put the tools of immersive storytelling into everyone’s hands through REACH, a platform that empowers anyone to create AR/VR stories straight from a browser.

45 min

https://youtu.be/PpTXQWdYzAw

Nonny de la Peña

One of the of the most influential pioneers in developing virtual reality as a modern means of expression, Nonny was named “The Godmother of Virtual Reality” by The Guardian and Engadget, while Fast Company acknowledged her as one of the people who made the world more creative for her ground-breaking work in immersive journalism.

https://emblematicgroup.com/

Artist Position – Peter Burr: Dream Buckets

Dream Buckets
A presentation on dreams and their relationship to 'the real world' as they manifest in the artist's work.

45 min

https://youtu.be/PpTXQWdYzAw

Peter Burr

Peter Burr (US) is an artist from Brooklyn, NY. A master of computer animation with a gift for creating images and environments that hover on the boundary between abstraction and figuration, Burr has, in recent years, devoted himself to exploring the concept of an endlessly mutating labyrinth. His practice often engages with tools of the […]

http://www.peterburr.org/

Tectonic Shift – Sabine Laimer: Mamavisor – Visual Effects Compositing and the Silver Linings of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Mamavisor - Visual Effects Compositing and the Silver Linings of the Covid-19 Pandemic Sabine Laimer, Compositing Supervisor at Weta Digital in Wellington, talks about how she found her way into Visual Effects, gives a brief overview of Weta and the compositing discipline and describes how the VFX landscape has transformed lately in her experience. On a more personal level, she gives insight into the difficulties of being a parent in a leading role, and the opportunities unlocked by working from home during the pandemic.

45 min

https://youtu.be/lv84kIEV7O8

Sabine Laimer

Sabine Laimer (AT/NZ) is a digital compositor and compositing supervisor for feature film and episodic content. Originally from Upper Austria and an FH Hagenberg and Bournemouth University alumna, Sabine has since worked for various Visual Effects studios across Germany, Australia, Canada, UK and New Zealand, including ScanlineVFX Munich, Double Negative London and Weta Digital, Wellington. […]

Tectonic Shift – Annegret Richter: A Look at the Good From the Bad!

A Look at the Good from the Bad! How the Covid-19 Pandemic Positively Changed Work Life For Women in Animation
The presentation has a closer look at how the animation industry in Germany adapted to the new situation during the pandemic lockdown and how it accelerated positive developments for people in the industry and especially for women.

45 min

https://youtu.be/lv84kIEV7O8

Annegret Richter

Annegret Richter (DE) is the executive manager of AG Animationsfilm, the German Animation Association and a founding member of the initiative Women in German Animation. She is also a curator for animated films, shorts and documentaries for festivals worldwide and she holds lectures and teaches at different film and media schools in Germany. She started […]

Tectonic Shift – Tobias Trebeljahr: How to Keep Doing Stuff

How to Keep Doing Stuff
During this talk I outline some methods I worked out over the years in order to keep myself productive in the face of a demanding industry, that often can feel like draining all the creative juices from you. In the first part I talk about my personal history and my changing motivations to create over the years. The second part has are some tips and tricks to get better at realizing what you set out to do. Finally, in the third part I do a quick digital painting demonstration in Photoshop to demonstrate what my methods are when doing color work.

45 min

https://youtu.be/lv84kIEV7O8

Tobias Trebeljahr

Tobi Trebeljahr (DE) , born 1987 in Darmstadt, attended high school in Ober-Ramstadt Hessen. Drawing since age 2 and using 3D software since age 13, he turned his hobby into a career at 19. The first stages of life saw him work in the video game industry as a shading and texture artist. Later, after […]

https://tea-tobs.tumblr.com/

Break

60 min

Tectonic Shift – Jesper Juul: Global Independent Immaterial Authenticity: The Challenges of Personal Video Game Design in a Time of Digital Sameness

Global Independent Immaterial Authenticity: The Challenges of Personal Video Game Design in a Time of Digital Sameness
In a time - before, during, and after the pandemic - where we communicate mainly through immaterial means, how do we create personal expression? In this talk, I will show the lessons we can learn from the 20 years of independent video game development.

45 min

https://youtu.be/zzRCEOi4BGo

Jesper Juul

Jesper Juul (DK) is a video game researcher interested in the myriad of ways in which video games are meaningful to players. He is an associate professor at the Royal Danish Academy in Copenhagen and has previously taught at NYU and MIT. He is the author of four books on video games, including Half-Real and […]

https://www.jesperjuul.net/

Tectonic Shift – Philomena Schwab: Crowd-Based Game Development in Pandemic Times: An Indie Perspective

Crowd-Based Game Development in Pandemic Times: An Indie Perspective
The pandemic has led the game industry to significant growth across all platforms. But who benefited the most? Did small, independent studios see a similar bump in their sales? And how has the pandemic as a whole influenced the way smaller studios operate? In this talk, Philomena Schwab will take a closer look at how her crowd-based indie studio Stray Fawn Studio faired in the past months in regard to crowd-funding, community management, events and newly-found routines she wants to continue even after the pandemic finally ends.

Brought to you by SUBOTRON & Austria Wirtschaftsservice GmbH

45 min

https://youtu.be/zzRCEOi4BGo

Philomena Schwab

Philomena Schwab (CH) is a game designer and community manager from Zurich, Switzerland. She wrote her master thesis about “Community Building for Indie Developers” and co-founded the indie game studio Stray Fawn in 2016. The studio’s main focus is the development of procedurally generated simulation games. In 2017 Philomena was named a 30 under 30 […]

Break

30 min

Art & Industry – Entagma: Proceduralism – The New Normal

Proceduralism – The New Normal
Historically generative/procedural design has been one of the first forms of computer generated art to evolve. However with increasing processing power and developments in hard- and software, computer generated imagery has seen a phase when tools and techniques became more geared towards a craftsmanship style of creation. This manifests in workflows relying heavily on manual labor by an artist.

While this working style can have its benefits, in an environment which increasingly demands the creation of highly detailed, complex artworks within short time frames, the power of generative, procedural workflows shines. Thus we're seeing a re-emergence of generative techniques and tools within the last few years, especially in the context of commercial artwork and visual effects.

In this talk Entagma's Manuel and Moritz go over the advantages and approaches used to create generative artworks (mainly but not only) in SideFX Houdini. They'll have fun in Internet bubbles, touch on fundamental ideas behind proceduralism and go over inspirational phenomena from physics, biology and math which can lead to surprising visual outcomes.

45 min

https://youtu.be/A8gb5mACQYg

Manuel Casasola Merkle & Moritz Schwind

Manuel Casasola Merkle (DE) and Moritz Schwind (DE) form the creative tech duo Entagma. After working commercially for clients like Nike, Audi, IBM or BMW, both decided to pursue their interest in generative design, algorithmic art, proceduralism and teaching. Besides their commercial and personal projects in which they focus on procedural techniques and applying algorithms […]

https://entagma.com/

Art & Industry – Tendril: The Art of Negotiating a Creative Collaboration

The Art of Negotiating a Creative Collaboration
Tendril Studio will discuss their creative process when approaching a new project from conception through to execution and how that has been adapted for the new ‘Work From Anywhere’ culture in the world today.

45 min

https://youtu.be/A8gb5mACQYg

Christopher Bahry, Ivelle Jargalyn, Mary Anne Ledesma & Alexandre Torres

Tendril is a design-driven animation, VFX, and digital innovation studio, creating beautiful and thoughtful visuals across all mediums. They believe that smart, beautiful stories should inspire new ways of looking at the world. With roots in Brazil and Canada, they are a diverse group of directors, designers, artists and producers that come together to push […]

https://tendril.ca/

Panel Discussion “Tectonic Shift”

60 min

https://youtu.be/A8gb5mACQYg

Manuel Casasola Merkle & Moritz Schwind

Manuel Casasola Merkle (DE) and Moritz Schwind (DE) form the creative tech duo Entagma. After working commercially for clients like Nike, Audi, IBM or BMW, both decided to pursue their interest in generative design, algorithmic art, proceduralism and teaching. Besides their commercial and personal projects in which they focus on procedural techniques and applying algorithms […]

https://entagma.com/
Christopher Bahry, Ivelle Jargalyn, Mary Anne Ledesma & Alexandre Torres

Tendril is a design-driven animation, VFX, and digital innovation studio, creating beautiful and thoughtful visuals across all mediums. They believe that smart, beautiful stories should inspire new ways of looking at the world. With roots in Brazil and Canada, they are a diverse group of directors, designers, artists and producers that come together to push […]

https://tendril.ca/

Synaesthetic Syntax – Welcome

5 min

https://youtu.be/7dE1owE81VU

Birgitta Hosea

Birgitta Hosea (SW/UK) is an artist, filmmaker, and researcher in expanded animation. Exhibitions include Venice & Karachi Biennales; Oaxaca & Chengdu Museums of Contemporary Art; InspiralLondon; Hanmi Gallery, Seoul. She has a solo exhibition at ASIFAKeil, Vienna in April 2020. Included in the Tate Britain and Centre d’Arte Contemporain, Paris, archives, she has been awarded […]

http://www.birgittahosea.co.uk/
Juergen Hagler

Juergen Hagler (AT) studied art education, experimental visual design, and cultural studies at the University for Art and Design in Linz, Austria. He currently works as a professor of Computer Animation and Animation Studies in the Digital Media department at the Hagenberg Campus of the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria. Since 2014 he a […]

https://research.fh-ooe.at/de/staff/215
Harry Whalley

Harry Whalley (UK) is a reader in Sound and Music at the University for the Creative Arts and founder of Music Composition and Technology BA/BSc. His work spans across music and sound for media including film, games, and site-specific works. His research interests currently range from art/science collaborations and interdisciplinary practice. He is the director […]

https://www.harrywhalley.com/

Synaesthetic Syntax – Panel I Introduction: A Return to the Material

5 min

https://youtu.be/7dE1owE81VU

Harry Whalley

Harry Whalley (UK) is a reader in Sound and Music at the University for the Creative Arts and founder of Music Composition and Technology BA/BSc. His work spans across music and sound for media including film, games, and site-specific works. His research interests currently range from art/science collaborations and interdisciplinary practice. He is the director […]

https://www.harrywhalley.com/

Synaesthetic Syntax – Traumatic Forms of Remembering

Traumatic forms of remembering.

This presentation situates my current immersive expanded animation practice through three phases, spanning 40 years of production strategies.

Phase 1: 2-screen Experiments 50 minutes 1981+
The numbing qualities of urban spaces in Suburban Melbourne and their impact on family life. Flicker, afterimages, chants, rants and repetitions Sonic performances. This was framed by Marshall Mcluhan’s theorizing about probes, pattern recognition and information speed-up. These performances and their visuals were driven and structured around the sonic qualities of the spaces in which they were performed. (Experiments is available on DVD from Artfilms)

Phase 2: 3 and 6 projector and light performances 2000+
The immersive quality of abuse and trauma—to show physically and materially through a manipulation of the apparatus what was invisible in pure digital form. This also evolved into body performance and the utterances of sound poetry to drive both the flicker and manipulating events from both digital projector and analog 16mm projectors, using filters, mirrors, masks and prisms and manipulating the soundtrack area with strobes and torches. (performed in Brisbane, Perth, Melbourne, Shanghai, Tokyo, Karlsruhe (Germany), London and Brighton (UK), Auckland and Christchurch (NZ)

This second phase of work was framed by Vilem Flusser’s “Freedom of the Migrant” and his concept of the “technical image” and marked a dialogue between analog and digital forms. I understood my migration from old to new technologies as an echo/replay/rehearsal of my parent’s physical migration from the old world (Europe) to the new world (Australia).

These performances were also framed by Chris Brewin’s conceptualizations on traumatic memory through a disturbed dialogue between Verbally Accesible Memory (VAM) and Situational Accesible memory (SAM)

Phase 3: 360 degree projections and installations.
This third phase is an embedded response to the Covid situation, which enabled me to screen my materially originating aesthetics into fulldome projection situations without the performative presence of the artist. (Rotunda screened at Jena International Full-dome festival in 2020). McLuhan, Flusser and Brewin’s theorizing remain traceable here. 360 degree projection spaces like fulldome also enabled a further exploration of peripheral vision and shifted the impact on the body of these immersive environments from the performer to the viewer. This research has included the use of time-lapse to contemplate horizon lines in seascape environments and generational replays of Warhol’s analog based screen-tests.

20 min

https://youtu.be/7dE1owE81VU

Dirk de Bruyn

Dirk de Bruyn (AU) is an Associate professor of Screen and Design at Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia, where he teaches Animation and Documentary Animation modules. He has made numerous animations, performance and installation work over the last 40 years. He was a founding member and past president of MIMA (Experimenta). His book The Performance of […]

Synaesthetic Syntax – Visual Music Through Media Archaeology

Despite the fact that an official definition of Visual Music as an art form is still somehow debated (Garro2012), in the last decades several worldwide exhibitions have been inspired by the idea of connecting sound and light under the common name of Visual Music (Ox2008). History is full of works in this direction: from the early color organs (vanHelden1994) to the cybernetic Musicolor Machine by Gordon Pask (Pickering2011), from the early experimental movies by Richter, Eggeling, Ruttmann, and Fischinger to the audiovisual creations on CRT screens by Mary Ellen Bute (Abbado2018), the audio-driven laser performances by Cross and Pellegrino (Collins2018), and the first animations by the Whitney brothers using analog computers (Youngblood1970) that anticipated modern digital softwares at the origin of the big audiovisual productions of festivals worldwide.

Although the concept of synaethesia is often adopted to describe these works, in the art world the word synesthesia has been widely misused and drifted from its original definition to identify any multimodal sensory experience such as live cinema or a VJ show (Evers2020). In this paper I describe my practice that goes back to a strict and somehow objective definition of synesthesia for Visual Music: when the same untranslated signal is sent to deflect a light beam to create images and to drive the coils of loudspeakers to produce sound.

I embrace the expressive limitations imposed by the direct translation of the same signal into light and sound in favor of the intrinsic gained coherence, avoiding any arbitrary juxtaposition of image and sound by the artists, often encouraged by the computational power of recent digital machines. Enveloping the audience in synchronous sound and light information visually reveals the underlying sound properties and geometries of sound that could otherwise remain obscure for the ears: frequency ratios, phase shifts, detuning and beatings, etc. I call this process visual listening: a deeper way of understanding sound through light (Novello2020).

To achieve perfect synchronicity I need tools that can exchange the same signals. The methodology at the base of my practice is media archeology: resurrecting and repurposing old media for the creation of live performances and contemplative installations (Zielinski2006). I am attracted to their aesthetic difference from the ubiquitous digital projections: fluid beam movement, vibrant intensity, infinite resolution, absence of frame rate, and line-based image. I also consider the environmental impact and the charm of repurposing obsolete devices. Finally, by exposing the public to the aesthetic differences between old and new devices, I invite them to reflect on the sociopolitical impact of technology, in a retrospective on technologization: what old means, and what value the new really adds.

I do not discard but embrace hybridization by combining the advantages of both eras: the fluidity and vibrancy of colors of analog light beams and the precision and replicability of digital control. I believe that a device that has been revived and hybridized in such way is capable of generating new aesthetic experiences for the audience impossible without considering our past and present technology at the same time.

Garro, D. 2012, From Sonic Art to Visual Music: Divergences, convergences, intersections. Organised Sound, 17(2).
Van Helden, A. and Hankins, T.L. 1994, Instruments, Osiris, 9, The University of Chicago Press.
Ox, J. and Keefer, C. 2008, On Curating Recent Digital Abstract Visual Music, http://www.centerforvisualmusic.org/Ox_Keefer_VM.htm.
Pickering, A. 2011, The Cybernetic Brain, Sketches of Another Future, University of Chicago Press.
Abbado, A. 2018, Visual Music Masters: Abstract Explorations of Past and Present Artists – Skira.
Collins, N. 2006, Handmade Electronic Music, Routledge.
Youngblood, G. 1970, Expanded Cinema, Dutton.
Evers, F. 2020, The Academy of the Senses, Synesthetics in Science, Art and Education, Art Science Interfaculty Press.
Novello, A. 2020, Media Archeology-based Visual Music, accepted for publication on Musica/Tecnologia XV, Firenze University Press.
Zielinski, S. 2006, Deep Time of the Media, Toward an Archaeology of Hearing and Seeing by Technical Means, MIT Press.

20 min

https://youtu.be/7dE1owE81VU

Alberto Novello

Alberto Novello (IT), a.k.a. JesterN’s practice repurposes found or decontextualized analog devices to investigate the connections between light and sound in the form of contemplative installations and performances. He repairs and modifies tools from our analog past: oscilloscopes, early game consoles, analog video mixers, and lasers. He is attracted to their intrinsic limitations and strong […]

http://jestern.com/

Synaesthetic Syntax – Visible Vibrations: Steven Woloshen’s Direct Animations and Jazz

As a technique, direct animation has historically tended to exhibit an expressive relationship to its musical accompaniment. The direct animators Len Lye, Norman McLaren and Harry Smith were integral to the introduction of popular music, and most especially jazz music, into the classical paradigms of visual music. Although the use of jazz in works from the 1930s through to the 1950s can be attributed in part to historical factors such as the popularity of swing and jazz’s influence on other avant-garde art forms, I argue that there is a physical, rhythmic rapport between direct animation and jazz and that their distinctive sensorial effects merit analysis in their own right. Direct animation and jazz are both characterised by propulsive rhythms and are highly visceral, both in terms of how they are made and in terms of their especially aggressive appeals to the bodily senses. In addition, the non-narrativity of improvisational jazz—as opposed to classical programmatic music or the set structures and lyrics of pop songs—is reflected in the formal flexibilities of animated abstract imagery. This expressively dynamic marriage between the frenetic visual aesthetics of abstract direct animation and the improvisational, syncopated polyrhythms of swing and bebop jazz continues to be exhibited in the contemporary works of Canadian experimental animator Steven Woloshen. This paper will examine the kinds of responses that are elicited by the visceral, manual nervousness of directly scratched and painted images on celluloid in Woloshen’s ‘Spotlight Series’ (1982-2006), focusing in particular on their propensity for evoking feelings of synaesthetic and kinaesthetic empathy with forms of swing and bebop. The complex configurations of shifting lines, shapes, patterns and sounds that comprise Wolshen’s animations flood the senses, inviting immersive absorption on the part of spectators by evoking responses synesthetically distributed amongst the optical, aural, proprioceptive and tactile powers of perception. Not only do Woloshen’s works offer visualisations of what a sound looks like in terms of shape, colour and movement, but they also display two-dimensional spatial configurations that place them in relation to other sounds. In this way, Woloshen’s isomorphic graphic compositions are expressive of the phenomenological experience of listening to as well as moving to music. This paper investigates the idea that Woloshen’s works are examples of visual music where the impulsive inner forces of dance are expressed graphically by means of the direct animation technique.

20 min

https://youtu.be/7dE1owE81VU

Lilly Husbands

Lilly Husbands (US/UK) is a Lecturer in Animation and Visual Culture at Middlesex University in London. Her research is broadly concerned with the legacy and evolution of experimental animation in the context of contemporary multimedia practice. She is an associate editor of animation: an interdisciplinary journal and co-editor of the book Experimental Animation: From Analogue […]

Synaesthetic Syntax – Panel I Discussion

30 min

https://youtu.be/7dE1owE81VU

Harry Whalley

Harry Whalley (UK) is a reader in Sound and Music at the University for the Creative Arts and founder of Music Composition and Technology BA/BSc. His work spans across music and sound for media including film, games, and site-specific works. His research interests currently range from art/science collaborations and interdisciplinary practice. He is the director […]

https://www.harrywhalley.com/

Break

35 min

Prix Forum – Computer Animation

45 min

https://youtu.be/_EJr0fZNozs

Helen Starr

Helen Starr (TT) is a Afro-Carib curator, producer and cultural activist from Trinidad, WI. She began curating exhibitions with artists such as Susan Hillier, Cindy Sherman and Marcel Duchamp in 1995. Helen founded The Mechatronic Library in 2010, to give marginalised artists access to technologies such as Game Engines, Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR). […]

http://www.themechatroniclibrary.com/
Guangli Liu

Guangli Liu (CN) is a Chinese artist born in 1990. He graduated from Villa Arson in Nice in 2017. Passionate about image-making, Guangli has developed an art practice around painting, video art, 3D animation, and virtual reality. His works attempt to question how the digital medium fits into contemporary storytelling and the reconstruction of our […]

https://www.liuguangli.net/
Veneta Androva

Veneta Androva (BG) is a visual artist who graduated in Fine Arts from Weißensee Academy of Art Berlin, did part of her study at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, and also obtained a degree in History of Art and Philosophy from Humboldt University Berlin. In her work she combines diverse media and […]

https://venetaandrova.com/
Erick Oh

Erick Oh (KR/US) is a Korean filmmaker/artist based in California, USA. His films have been introduced and awarded at numerous film festivals, including Academy Awards, Annie Awards, Annecy Animation Festival, Zagreb Film Festival, SIGGRAPH, Anima Mundi, and more. With his fine arts background in Seoul National University, Korea, and film at UCLA, USA, Erick became […]

http://erickoh.com/

Synaesthetic Syntax – Panel II Introduction: Hearing Colour Seeing Sound

5 min

https://youtu.be/tsmcA2dlSvQ

Birgitta Hosea

Birgitta Hosea (SW/UK) is an artist, filmmaker, and researcher in expanded animation. Exhibitions include Venice & Karachi Biennales; Oaxaca & Chengdu Museums of Contemporary Art; InspiralLondon; Hanmi Gallery, Seoul. She has a solo exhibition at ASIFAKeil, Vienna in April 2020. Included in the Tate Britain and Centre d’Arte Contemporain, Paris, archives, she has been awarded […]

http://www.birgittahosea.co.uk/

Synaesthetic Syntax – Expanded Critical Animersion: A Locked-Down Experience of Collaborative, Oulipian Animation and Textuality

This paper will examine how virtual spaces became the focus for a collaborative animation project, conducted online under conditions of Pandemic lockdown. In the absence of intimate proximity the authors remediated their physcialised research methods, deploying VR, Ping Pong in the Unity Game engine, and an Artificially Intelligent third collaborator (or ‘coagulent’) to evoke their practice of walking and writing, and researching while in the world of parks, food, play and sensory engagement, which they lacked under lockdown. This also involved inventing and animating fictional collaborative islands where the authors could meet weekly to research and write and to share their drawings and animated works.

These methods were not a nostalgic practice but a means to examine how new forms of visual, sonic, animated, and embodied storytelling might become possible across distances and circumstances. The authors reassembled their pre-covid sounds and senses, memories and collaborative methods within virtual spaces, while being acutely aware of the surveillant nature of those spaces and fatigued from being online, mediated for most of the day.

To avoid a neoliberal framing of technology as idealised or utopian, the authors deployed Brecht’s (Brecht, 1964) ‘Alienation Effect’ or A-effect to their animation, which they call Animersion, this occurs when people are encouraged to question their preconceptions and look at the familiar in a new and different way– that is, to make it strange. The authors maintained a practice of what they call ‘immerticality’ (critical immersion) to remain mindful of the platitudes and hype so often associated with virtual and digital technologies.
While locked down the authors also deployed an Oulipian (1974) animation approach, returning to the algorithmic process of their earlier work, The Phi Books (Dare, Antonopoulou, 2008 - 2021). To re-energise their collaboration under conditions of anxiety and isolation, the authors developed and used a Chatbot to represent a place. This is positioned as an Oulipian method, taking language and according to it a new set of agencies and imperatives, somewhere between chaos and order, defamiliarizing familiar patterns of writing and deploying it in AR animated works which will be discussed and evaluated. The authors remediated ways and methods of material thinking in the same ways that Carter (2005) uses the embodied nature of material to produce new understandings about ourselves, our histories and the culture we inhabit. For example, thinking through drawing, animation, model making and sound.

The authors will analyse how they deployed technologies as heuristics for collaboration and how they position virtual spaces as non-predetermining structures. They will also convey an ‘immerticritical’ - immersive and critical - approach to technology, language, and animated image-making.

20 min

https://youtu.be/tsmcA2dlSvQ

Eleanor Dare & Alexandra Antonopoulou

Eleanor Dare (UK) is an academic and critical technologist with a Ph.D. and MSc in Arts and Computational Technologies from the Department of Computing, Goldsmiths. Eleanor was formerly a Reader in Digital Media and Head of Programme for MA Digital Direction, at the Royal College of Art. Eleanor is now working with Central Saint Martins […]

Synaesthetic Syntax – Painting Music: Using Artificial Intelligence to Create Music From Live-Painted Drawings

Painting Music uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) to create music from live-painted drawings, in real time and unique for each performance. The AI algorithm is based on the type of learning used by the human brain, which responds and produces musical notes that reflect the development of live-painted drawings (Starkey et al., 2020).

The project aim is not to create a process that always results in harmonious music and melodies, but that the AI can make ‘mistakes’. Harmonious notes may be considered uninteresting by some people but beautiful to others; or may result in an interesting and novel musical form for some listeners but jarring for others. Similarly, conflict transpires in the visual component through the subject of each drawing and the application of dramaturgical drawing techniques.

Previous studies (Fast and Horvitz, 2017) have shown how public perception of AI has changed over time, and that although this perception has been more optimistic than pessimistic, the fear of loss of control of AI is steadily increasing. The exploration of this question is thus at the heart of this production aiming to tap into the public’s fear or excitement of AI and the change that this will bring to all facets of society.

This project has been developed with a focus on live stage performance with the outputs from the artist unfolding on a projector screen in real time and the musical outputs from the AI process amplified through loudspeakers. A prototype of this system was implemented in a live stage performance at Aberdeen May Festival 2019, whose narrative centred on the question Is AI good or bad?. Other outputs are a 20-minute film and a body of visual artwork for digital platforms and gallery environments.

This paper focusses on the visual and aural outputs of the live stage performance exploring whether AI is good or bad. The answer to this question is explored through the interaction of the painting and the generated music itself. The generated music by the AI is different each time the process is run, and so the artist does not truly know what to expect, which brings an element of danger to the work. In addition, the audience will react in their own way to the generated music, and this reaction will be linked to the individual’s own fear or confidence in AI – when the AI creates an unexpected note, they may be excited by this, or find it jarring. Either way it will generate an emotional reaction which is a combination of the live evolving artwork; the AI generated music (an artistic representation of the painting in itself); and the individual’s own preconceived ideas of AI.

Fast, E. and Horvitz, E. (2017), ‘Long-term trends in the public perception of artificial intelligence’,
AAAI, pp. 963–69.
Starkey, A., Steenhauer, K., Caven, J. (2020). Painting Music: Using Artificial Intelligence to create music from live painted drawings. Drawing: Research, Theory, Practice DRTP 5.2.

20 min

https://youtu.be/tsmcA2dlSvQ

Kate Steenhauer, Andrew Starkey & Jack Caven

Kate Steenhauer (UK) is a visual artist whose practice explores the dynamic and interactive capacity of drawing in dialogue with other art forms, technology and their relationship with its audience. This moves visual art as a traditionally static experience into a dynamic interactive art form that is temporal, transient and transformational. Multidisciplinary collaborations include dance, […]

https://katesteenhauer.com/

Synaesthetic Syntax – Music as a Path-Guide to Animate

This article analyzes how to create animated images from music, considering the nature of its purpose and personal experience from the animator. The methodology applied is case studies of the two shorts that used identifiable figures but no narrative. While one is a commissioned work with defined music, the other is a free expression of the animator, including the music choice. The first is Miudinho (Cláudio Roberto 2013), a video clip made from the homonymous music by Heitor Villa-Lobos, to the contest Conexão Animações to a music group - in this case, DuoGisbranco, a double of women pianists who performed the Villa-Lobos’ music. The second short is an independent film d'auteur, Mother (Gordeeff 2018), an animation starting from very short shots in live-action. With this premise, the animator developed the hand time-lapse to the initial sequences, and just after that, found music (which was acquired from a specialized site) and could complete the animation. Although the few screening - the most significant were Miudinho at Anima Mundi 2014 (Brazil) and Mother at Bogocine 2018 (Colombia) -, the shorts are proper material to this research. Because they show sharp animation-music links, and the own animator can testify all her decisions and explain them. Therefore, to construct these analyses, they are based on the studies of Laurent Jullier (2002), Michel Fano (1981), and Philip Brophy (1991) - about "sound images", “auditory attention”, “sound and sense”, and the music application into Disney productions. However, in light of also the analyses and testimonies by Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston (1981), Norman McLaren (McWilliams 1991), and Gunnar Strøm (2007). From this theoretical ground aligned to the animated processes of these shorts, one can elaborate on profound analyses about the music-animation relationship, responding: Which are the main aspects to awake the author's imagination to create figures and animate them? How can music influence her / his aesthetic chooses? And through this way, to increase the understanding of the marriage of music and animation.

References:
Brophy, P. (1991). The Animation of Sound. In Cholodenko, A. (Ed.) (1991). The Illusion of Life. Sydney: Prower Publicaions, Australian Film Commission pp. 67-112.
Fano, M. (1981). Le Son et le Sen. In Cheteau, D., Gardien, A., Jost, F. (Directors) (1981). Cinémas de la Modernité: Films, théories. Colloque de Ceresy. Paris: Éditions Klincksieck, pp. 105-122.
Jullier, L. (2002), Cinéma et Cognition. Paris: L’Harmattan.
McWilliams, D. (Ed.)(1991). Norman McLaren: On the Creative Process. Quebec: National Film Board of Canada.
Miudinho (2013). Direction: Cláudio Roberto. Brazil: Quadro Vermelho Produções, Cria!Cultura. Available: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmOoc6VKPmo.
Mother (2018). Direction: Gordeeff. Brazil/Portugal: Quadro Vermelho Produções. Available: https://vimeo.com/272612759 password: mae2018
Strøm, G. (2007). The Two Golden Ages of Animated Music Video. Animation Studies, Vol.2. Valencia: California Institute of the Arts. Also available: https://journal.animationstudies.org/category/volume-2/
Thomas, F., Johnston, O. (1981). Disney and Sound In Thomas, F., Johnston, O. (1981) Disney Animation: The Illusion of Life. Ed. Walton Rawls. New York: Abbeyville Press, pp. 284-301.

20 min

https://youtu.be/tsmcA2dlSvQ

Eliane Gordeeff

Eliane Gordeeff (PT) is an independent animator, professor, and researcher with a Ph.D. in Fine Arts – Multimedia (FBAUL/Portugal 2018) with a scholarship from CNPq (Brazil) and Erasmus+ at the University of Paris 8 (France). Then, she examined how the animated image can represent imaginary elements of the characters. She is a member of ASIFA […]

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eliane-Gordeeff

Synaesthetic Syntax – Panel II Discussion

30 min

https://youtu.be/tsmcA2dlSvQ

Birgitta Hosea

Birgitta Hosea (SW/UK) is an artist, filmmaker, and researcher in expanded animation. Exhibitions include Venice & Karachi Biennales; Oaxaca & Chengdu Museums of Contemporary Art; InspiralLondon; Hanmi Gallery, Seoul. She has a solo exhibition at ASIFAKeil, Vienna in April 2020. Included in the Tate Britain and Centre d’Arte Contemporain, Paris, archives, she has been awarded […]

http://www.birgittahosea.co.uk/

Break

25 min

Synaesthetic Syntax – Panel III Introduction: In Front of Your Eyes and Ears

5 min

https://youtu.be/nJqOQg1U18E

Juergen Hagler

Juergen Hagler (AT) studied art education, experimental visual design, and cultural studies at the University for Art and Design in Linz, Austria. He currently works as a professor of Computer Animation and Animation Studies in the Digital Media department at the Hagenberg Campus of the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria. Since 2014 he a […]

https://research.fh-ooe.at/de/staff/215

Synaesthetic Syntax – Audiovisual Performance Notation

I. INTRO
From Iannis Xennakis’ multisensory “Polytopes” to the groundbreaking “9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering” events, we have witnessed an evolution of audiovisual exploration through the past decades. With the increasing democratization of technology, highly complex performances orchestrate sounds and images today using various media in unison.
The assemblage of such contemporary audiovisual experiences presents today an unresolved notational challenge. In the past, artists have used a variety of unconventional visual systems, such as Lázló Moholy-Nagy’s score-sketch for the “Mechanical Eccentric” theatre play (Gropius, 1925). His performance diagram describes gradual transformations of light, movement, film, and sound (Figure 1).
Given our current technological landscape; What kind of notational systems can we use to shape audiovisual experiences using contemporary and traditional instruments? We will discuss our performance “The Generation of Maps” (2020) as a case study. This project demonstrates how a diagrammatic approach can serve as an orchestrating force for algorithmic systems, graphic notation, code-generated imagery, and live electronic sounds using modular synthesizers.

II. SOUND-IMAGE GENERATION
Generative environments allow the performer to approach live acts from a programming perspective using a predefined set of rules. In modern computer music compositions, the algorithm often substitutes the classical score (Weibel, 2019).
In our performance, computer code synchronized the sound generation process to certain visual events or cues (Figure 2a-b). These events sent voltage signals to a modular synthesizer. Human performers improvised with the machine manipulating sound onstage. A sound-reactive component completed the feedback loop by listening to the sounds in the room and transforming the visual component accordingly. In synthesis, a system where both sounds and images shaped each other continuously.

III. INTERFACE AS NOTATION
Audiovisual environments using custom software open new avenues for sound-image translation. The visual component becomes an interface between the algorithm and the viewer. Our projections offered the audience a glimpse of the system’s composition, its internal mechanisms, and the various rules governing the audiovisual experience (Figures 3-4).

IV. PERFORMING THE SYSTEM
In addition to the live generative component, we designed a performance score. From a visual perspective, this diagram resembled both an architectural plan and experimental cartography. The original score, made with ink and paper, provided essential information and critical time-based instructions to the performers. Figures 5-8 describe this drawing in detail.
*
Our diagrammatic approach balanced precise visual representations and full abstractions to generate and visualize sound. As a result, these graphics expand the listening experience and provide new insights into the audiovisual phenomena for both creators and audiences.

REFERENCES
Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe. Sound Art : Sound As a Medium of Art. Edited by Peter Weibel. Karlsruhe, Germany: ZKM/Center for Art and Media, 2019. p 124.
Walter Gropius, Arthur S. Wensinger, Oskar Schlemmer, Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, and Farkas Molnar. The Theater of the Bauhaus. Wesleyan University Press, 1961. p 45.

20 min

https://youtu.be/nJqOQg1U18E

Juan Manuel Escalante & Yin Yu

Juan Manuel Escalante | Assistant Professor @ California State University Juan Manuel Escalante (US) is a designer and an artist working with computer code, modular synthesizers, and analog drawings. His work has been shown in the United States, France, the United Kingdom, Spain, Peru, South Korea, Mexico and featured in major festivals and exhibitions, such […]

http://www.jmescalante.info/

Synaesthetic Syntax – Alignment of Rhythms in Live Coded Audio-Visual Performance

This paper explores the concept of rhythms and Lefebvre’s Rhythmanalysis as found within live coded visuals and sounds. It will then explore the work of the live code collective Codie, who perform visuals and music at events such as Algoraves.

Codie
Codie is a trio made up of Sarah Groff Hennigh-Palermo, Melody Loveless and Kate Sicchio. We code visuals and sounds to create an audio-visual performance experience. Our approach is to create an overall composition of both animations and music improvised live that does not prioritize creating systems that seek ways to synchronize visuals and sound, like sending cues using OSC messages or implementing automatic audio reactivity like FFT analysis. Instead we they focus on simply beginning the performances with a frame counter aligned with the BPM of the music and coordinate the beginning and ending of their performances at the same time. This methodology relies less on the deliberate synchronicity of moments and favors relationships.

Rhythmanalysis
In Rhythmanalysis, Lefebrve examines rhythm as an organizing principle for both apprehending and comprehending social and theoretical relations across experiences. Regardless of critical target, rhythms are characterized through the health and interference manifested in their relationships to one another. The polyrhythmic are those that live alongside one another, unconnected but not interfering. The arrhythmic are polyrhythmic relations that become pathological, whereas eurhythmic relations are the reverse, in which the interaction becomes constructive. Live performance creates an ideal venue in which to explore rhythm, by creating a situation in which the audience is urged to abandon themselves to the performance; live code performance brings the relationship of rhythms to the fore by linking the visual and aural through eurhythmia. This primary rhythmic relationship is echoed and supported through the constituent rhythms of the music and visuals themselves.

We layer our aesthetics, constructing complex rhythmic relationships while In constructing complex rhythmic relationships, Codie creates aesthetics that are layered, embracing mess and disorder. In the Lefebvrian context these are eurhythmic relations: interactions between audio samples and synths, and visual shapes and colors generate complex rhythmic structures that are more than the sum of their constituents. Within a Codie performance, audio samples start with simple beats, looping and adding and building. The visual also finds its way from simple patterns to more textured, layered and animated sequences. From here some sounds and images simultaneously cue and inspire one another. Interwoven compositions emerge in real-time through looping code. Moments fold together. Contrasting patterns explore the arrhythmic and polyrhythmic, pulling and pushing with amounts of information being presented changing with the rhythmic structures.

References
Collins, Nick (2011) Live Coding of Consequence in Leonardo 44(3):207-211. Cambridge: MIT Press.
Lefebvre, Henri (2004) Rhythmanalysis Space, Time and Everyday Life. Translated by Elden, Stuart and Moore, Gerald. London and New York: Continuum.

20 min

https://youtu.be/nJqOQg1U18E

Kate Sicchio, Sarah Groff Hennigh-Palermo & Melody Loveless

Kate Sicchio (US) is a choreographer and media artist based in Richmond, Virginia, specializing in algorithmic choreography and wearable technology. She has shown work at many international venues, including New York Hall of Science (US), Access Space (UK) and Inspace Gallery (UK). When not live-coding, Sarah Groff Hennigh-Palermo (DE) makes large-scale video art and computer […]

https://codie.live/

Synaesthetic Syntax – Liveware: Improvisation, Interaction, and Process Intensity

Liveware [1] is an audio-visual duo combining live-coded animation and musical performance. “Liveness” for each modality is understood as a fluid interplay between pre-composed and improvised dynamic processes. Similarly, the correspondence between image and sound exhibits changing levels of control and indeterminacy. Taken together as matters of degree not kind, these two dimensions – performativity and synaesthetic syntax – provide the grounding for theorizing an expanded animation practice substantiated in our paper with documentation of Liveware’s past performances and work-in-progress. [2]

From computer game design, we recontextualize the concept of Process Intensity [3] as the ratio between “operations” and “data” – between the degrees of freedom in a dynamic process (whether carried out by a human or nonhuman agent or in their interactions) and the invocation of pre-rendered elements (such as samples, recordings, conventionally notated scores, or training data). From music theory, we understand composing as slowed-down improvisation, but equally that the improvisor must to some degree anticipate before playing. [4] In Liveware, both human and non-human agents improvise, applying their “trained wits” to unforeseen circumstances as they arise on the fly. [5]

In Piano Counterpoint, performed to a 1973 score by Steve Reich performed by Century, six interlocking musical canons correspond to a live-coded geometric visual “score” that is entirely generated by Lawson’s live-coded algorithms. Improvisation for Expanded Piano animates abstract imagery in correspondence to an algorithmically and manually controlled player-piano. Small Infinities feeds Century’s modulated and spatialized accordion [6] into Lawson’s semi-controlled/semi-autonomous visual system, which reads and overwrites images from a looping sequential image memory buffer creating temporally-shifting feedback. The Isle is Full of Noises evokes a scene from Shakespeare’s play The Tempest, with live generation of images using an auto-visual system built with a machine learning (ML) algorithm [6] trained on contrasting feature films: Videodrome and Planet of the Apes. During the performance the ML utilizes its hyper-dimensional space of learnt imagery to create real-time animation from audio spectra and audio feature data ingestion that are generated using eight asynchronous loops of granular-processed human, animal and nature sounds mixed live. In current work in progress, the visual system is built with a ML algorithm [7] trained to “translate” from one image to another, while the sonic system expands the piano instrument system along the dimension of algorithmic autonomy. The performer hand-draws images that are captured by a video camera and translated through the ML to create real-time animation.

1. Initially a humorous slang term designating the “human factor” in computing.
2. https://www.shawnlawson.com/improvisation-interaction-and-process-intensity/
3. Crawford, Chris. "Process Intensity." Journal of Computer Game Design 1, no. 5 (1987).
4. Schoenberg, Arnold. "Brahms the Progressive." In Style and Idea: Philosophical Library, 1950.
5. Ryle, Gilbert. "Improvisation." Mind 85, no. 337 (1976).
6. Using the Expanded Instrument System, designed by Pauline Oliveros.
7. The Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) technique of training was used.

20 min

https://youtu.be/nJqOQg1U18E

Michael Century & Shawn Lawson

Michael Century (US), a musician and media arts historian, is Professor of Music and New Media at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He founded the Media Arts program at the Banff Centre for the Arts. His improvisational music compositions use interactive electronics to modulate and transform solo performances on piano and accordion. In 2022, the MIT Press […]

Synaesthetic Syntax – Panel III Discussion

30 min

https://youtu.be/nJqOQg1U18E

Juergen Hagler

Juergen Hagler (AT) studied art education, experimental visual design, and cultural studies at the University for Art and Design in Linz, Austria. He currently works as a professor of Computer Animation and Animation Studies in the Digital Media department at the Hagenberg Campus of the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria. Since 2014 he a […]

https://research.fh-ooe.at/de/staff/215

Break

25 min

Synaesthetic Syntax – Keynote: Refik Anadol

Istanbul native Refik Anadol is a media artist, director and pioneer in the aesthetics of machine intelligence. His body of work puts creativity at the intersection of humans and machines. Using data as his primary material, he creates site-specific sculptures, live audio/visual performances and immersive installations that encourage us to rethink our engagement with the physical world, its temporal and spatial dimensions and the creative potential of machines.

Perception of space – whether it is physical, digital, topological, quantum, or hyper – requires particular kinds of interactive and cognitive processes through which we become aware of the relative positions of objects around us. Our techno-aesthetic inquiries into how we make sense of spaces focus on revealing numerous meanings of this awareness from the intersection of post-digital architecture, neuroscience, technology, and machine learning. In this lecture, I will discuss how audio-visual, immersive, and interactive media arts help us overcome the limitations of perspectival representation and play a crucial role in the symbiotic relationship between perception and imagination.

60 min

https://youtu.be/QylurniHR1A

Refik Anadol

Refik Anadol (TR/US, *1985, Istanbul, Turkey) is a media artist, director and pioneer in the aesthetics of data and machine intelligence. His body of work locates creativity at the intersection of humans and machines. In taking the data that flows around us as the primary material and the neural network of a computerized mind as […]

https://refikanadolstudio.com/

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Expanded Animation – Mapping and Unlimited Landscape

The symposium Expanded Animation began in 2013 and offered a first approach to the expanding field of computer animation. It has since become an established part of the Ars Electronica Animation Festival and the international competition Prix Ars Electronica Computer Animation. Every year under an overarching theme, the symposium has researched the field of technology, art, animation, and aesthetics, investigated the collapsing boundaries in digital animation, and explored positions and future trends. As with the first conferences on computer animation at Ars Electronica in the 1980s, practice and theory are equally important. The richly illustrated publication Expanded Animation: Mapping an Unlimited Landscape features contributions from speakers and artists from the past six years and presents an overview of the prize winners in prix category Computer Animation from 2011 to 2018.

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SYNAESTHETIC SYNTAX

A scene from Machine Memoires: Space by Refik Anadol
Refik Anadol, Machine Memoires: Space

Synaesthetic Syntax: Seeing Sound / Hearing Vision

Symposium details: Sunday 12th September 2021, Live Broadcasting Event during the Ars Electronica Festival

In the age of pandemic, our previously normal experiences of human touch and intimate proximity have become mediated by the screen rather than felt directly. We can no longer hear live music and feel the sonic vibrations; see a painting’s texture in close proximity; become immersed in the events of live theatre, or engage in debate: these events are now bounded by the flat rectangular screen and limited by the extent of the pixels in our screen’s resolution.

Under these conditions, how can animation, in combination with music or audio art, re-engage us with bodily sensations received through the senses?

Coming together as a series of online events, this year’s Expanded Animation symposium at Ars Electronica continues a dialogue about relationships between the senses, in particular the auditory and the visual. What are the rules, principles, and processes that govern correlations between sound and animation? How might these embodied sensations be explored, unpacked and reassembled in our age of virtual communication intensified by COVID-19? 

Keynote Speaker

Our Keynote Speaker is the media artist, director, and pioneer in data and machine intelligence aesthetics, Refik Anadol. His body of work locates creativity at the intersection of humans and machines. In taking the data that flows around us as the primary material and the neural network of a computerized mind as a collaborator, Anadol paints with a thinking brush, offering us radical visualizations of our digitized memories and expanding the possibilities of architecture, narrative, and the body in motion. Anadol’s site-specific AI datasculptures, live audio/visual performances, and immersive installations take many forms while encouraging us to rethink our engagement with the physical world, its temporal and spatial dimensions, and the creative potential of machines.

Schedule

The schedule for Synaesthetic Syntax can be viewed under Program for Sunday, 12th September 2021.

PARTNERS & CREDITS

Partners

The symposium has been made possible by a collaboration between the Digital Arts program at the Hagenberg Campus of the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, the University for the Creative Arts and the Ars Electronica Festival.

Media Partners

Supported by

Organization

Expanded Animation is brought to you by a group of dedicated people from the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, Hagenberg Campus (FH OÖ), and the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, UK (UCA).

Conference Organizers (FH OÖ)

Jeremiah Diephuis
Juergen Hagler
Wolfgang Hochleitner
Michael Lankes
Patrick Proier
Huoston Rodrigues
Christoph Schaufler
Alexander Wilhelm

Conference Organizers (UCA)

Birgitta Hosea
Harry Whalley

Team (FH OÖ)

Jakob Aigner | Trailer
Axel Bauer | Graphics, Production Director
Özenc Dinler | Associate Director, Studio Engineering
Elias Engel | Audio, Associate Director
Nils Gallist | Social Media
Roman Gökler | Associate Director, Photo Documentation, Social Media
Tina Greul | Camera
Sarah Haim | Associate Director, Camera, Studio Engineering
Jascha Hanisch | Graphics
Cedric Hansalek | Studio Engineering, Teaser, Video Documentation
Josef Ibrahim | Associate Director, Social Media
Martin Krischanitz | Trailer
Kevin La | Associate Director, Graphics, Video Documentation, Web
Daniel Leichinger | Associate Director, Graphics
Selina Mensah | Camera, Social Media, Studio Engineering
Konstantin Papesh | Audio
Laura Pointinger | Graphics
Nadine Promberger | Camera, Graphics, Social Media, Video Documentation
Markus Raudaschl | Trailer
Julian Salhofer | Audio, Production Director
Angelica Schalk | Social Media, Studio Engineering
Günther Stromberger | Audio
Elias Wolschlager | Web
Jennifer Ye | Web

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